Rototillers – Everything You Need to Know

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Those who follow Your Gardening Friend on Facebook, you know we purchased a rototiller about two months ago. Prior to that, we had been renting or borrowing.

When we needed to use a rototiller, we’d spend 2.5 hours hooking up the trailer, driving to the rental location, loading the tiller onto the trailer, driving back home, unloading the tiller, loading it back onto the trailer, driving it back to the rental location, unloading it again, driving back home, and unhooking the trailer. The 2.5 hours don’t even take into account the time to TILL the ground!

Now that we own a rototiller, when I need to till, I walk up to the barn, roll the tiller out, and till. When I’m done, I roll it back into the barn. What a time-saving difference!

As I add more organic matter and natural soil conditioners to this particular patch of land, in time, it won’t need to be tilled each spring.

I realize there are MANY ways to garden that do NOT involve the use of a rototiller, but for those who prefer to use a rototiller, here are a few things to consider when making a rototiller purchase (in case you’re currently renting or borrowing like I was).

I’ll cover five (5) main points:

- HP and CC
- 2-Stroke vs. 4-Stroke Engines
- Tillers vs. Cultivators
- Rear Tines vs. Front Tines
- Prices

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Eating Healthy – Progress Not Perfection {Recycled Post}

zirconicusso / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

With all the new faces here, I thought I’d recycle a couple old posts here and there. This post was published January 2012. There’s also a part 2 and part 3 to this healthy eating mini series.

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This is the time of year people start making new year resolutions. Even if you’re the type of person who cringes at the idea of new year resolutions, you still probably entertain some similar line of thought. It’s a new year, a new start, a blank slate. New goals are only natural.

Planning to eat healthier in the year to come is a great goal, and a common one. Sometimes, though, we can go about our goals all wrong. If our goals are not broken down into clearly identifiable, measureable, manageable goals, we have nothing specific to aim at, or means of knowing if we’ve succeeded.

On the other hand, sometimes the problem isn’t a lack of specificity, but rather unrealistic timeframes for meeting our goals. We know what needs to be done, but we think it all has to be done TODAY. With this mindset, you might find yourself

  1. Tossing into the trash everything currently in your refrigerator, freezer, kitchen cupboards, and pantries because the ingredients, or process by which the food is made, are not healthy.
  2. In a single afternoon, purchasing from Craigslist a pair of goats, a dairy cow, dozen hens, a few pigs, and a plowing ox.
  3. Renting a cattle trailer, and picking up all the new farm animals from the 5 surrounding counties.
  4. Tying the animals to your garage, until your husband is done constructing the farm fence, small barn, and hen house.
  5. While the new heard of animals graze on their leashes, grabbing the ox, tying him to your waist, and plowing the soon-to-be strictly organic garden.
  6. Teaching your children the nutritional value of your chemical-free front lawn, while waiting to harvest the organic crops.

Whew!! Now … don’t get me wrong. You can do that. However, living a healthier, more organic, sustainable life should not equate to an unnecessary increase in stress. If it does, what’s the point?! So now you’re eating a “perfect” diet, but your family is falling apart, and your stomach lining is being slowly eaten away by ulcers. Way to go! ;)

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4 Things the Reluctant, First-Time Gardener Should Know

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original image credit
© Pakhnyushchyy | Dreamstime.com

Some want to start a garden, but are hesitant … reluctant … fearful of what they don’t know that might cause them to FAIL.

If you identify with that statement, my hope is that after reading this post, you’ll be encouraged, motivated, confident, and EXCITED about starting your first garden!!!

Experienced, green-thumb gardeners, try to recall your first garden. Is there any advice, a nugget of wisdom, you can share with these reluctant gardeners?

Reluctant gardeners, let’s get started! :)

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Garden-Ready Checklist

January is the time of year when we think about what we plan to accomplish in the year to come. For today’s post, I decided to focus on one specific goal: planning for the spring garden.

I think I’ve mentioned before how I LOVE planning stuff, almost as much as seeing a project accomplished. (There are times, however, when I just jump right into something, with little to no forethought. I almost ALWAYS regret it later.) I’m not sure what gardening goals you have for this year, but maybe this checklist will help.

© Michyn

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When Bugs Are Bug’n Ya … Remedies

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© Reddogs | Dreamstime.com

Exodus 8:20b-21 20b) “… Then say to him, ‘Thus says the LORD: “Let My people go, that they may serve Me. 21) Or else, if you will not let My people go, behold, I will send swarms of flies on you and your servants, on your people and into your houses. The houses of the Egyptians shall be full of swarms of flies, and also the ground on which they stand…” ‘ “

I love the detailed, historical account in the book of Exodus of how

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Spring and My Rebirth

hosta

Spring is Here!

Spring is such an exciting time for a gardener. Flowers are popping up everywhere; garden plans are on the forefront of the mind; the daylight time is lengthening; and birds are singing, and preparing their nests for the arrival of their offspring.

I suppose if I were to try and sum up spring in a single word it would be rebirth – a rebirthing of perennials, vegetation, gardens, and wildlife (or a life cycle continuation). Spring’s Symbolism

Spring is also symbolic of what many people experience spiritually.

© Ingrid Heczko

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